Bud's Picks Best Cannabis Infused Edibles of 2021

13 Best Cannabis Infused Edibles in California 2021

2021 has a been a huge year for Cannabis.  States such as New Jersey and Arizona have legalized recreational Cannabis.  Others states including New York and Virginia have confirmed they are on track for legal weed.  And of course cannabis was deemed 'essential' in the midst of the COVID19 pandemic, yet another signal that social acceptance for cannabis at an all time high.  As more consumers gain access to legal weed products, the fastest growing product category in recreational states is edibles.  In California, where our cannabis industry is robust and mature, edibles are now the largest product category outside of flower.  To celebrate our love for infused treats, we're happy to list our best edibles for delivery in California.

Edibles come in all formats, flavors, and CBD and THC ratios.  There are also options for all dietary restrictions- including Vegan, Kosher and Sugar Free diets, among others.  Short on time or patience?  We can offer edible infused with nano-emulsion technology with promotes bioavailability- or basically a faster on-set of affects.

Here are the best edibles in California based on their popularity on bud.com:

Best Cannabis Infused Cookies 2021

Cannabis Edibles Cookies
Bud's Picks Best Edibles of 2021 - Cookies: Big Pete's

Big Pete's Treats

The iconic Santa Cruz based cookie maker...makes cookies.  The best infused weed cookies.  And thats it.  A refreshing notion, at a time when many brands veer into multiple product categories trying to seize more sales and market.  Founded and run by a father and son Team, Big Pete's has been making infused cookies and spreading surf city vibes since the prop 215 days.  Their impressive lineup includes chocolate chip, DOUBLE chocolate chip, and for those who want it all..Peanut butter oatmeal chocolate chip. All flavors are sold in 100mg THC bags with each cookie at 10 mg, with Indica and  Sativa options.

Korova

Prior to recreational legalization in 2018, Korova was synonymous with high dose edible in California.  The infamous Black Bar was among several products loaded with of over 1000 mg or THC, favored by medical patients and high tolerance edibles users.  With adult-use regulations reigning in dosage standardization and maximum THC limits per package (100 mg) and dose (10 mg), Korova reinvented itself and launched vape and flower lines.   However we still know them best for their cookies!  California consumer still love the selection of flavors including Lemon Poppy, Vegan Oatmeal, and our favorite, their signature Mint Chocolate Chip.

Best Infused Gummies 2021

Plus Cannabis Infused Gummies
Bud's Picks Best Edibles of 2021 - Gummies: Plus

Kanha Gummies

Manufactured by multi state operator Sunderstorm, One of the largest Gummy producers in California, Kanha offers the largest combinations of products in the State.  Kanha offers over 20 SKUs in various exotic flavors within three distinct lines of gummies.  The regular gummies come in Indica/Sativa/Hybrid with great flavors, like Lychee, our favorite.  Servings are 10mg.

Kanha Cannabis Infused Gummie Treats

Kanha Nano Gummies

The best fast acting acting cannabis gummy!  Nano-molecular technology is used to create cannabinoid particles smaller than a wavelength of light, which makes for a quicker onset and higher absorption rate.  The average onset is around 15 minutes!  There are 5 flavors to choose from and options including Key Lime and Cran-Pomegranate Punch.  The Nano line includes both 5 mg and 10 mg serving options.

Kanha Nano Vegan Gummies

Vegan cannabis gummies utilizes fast-acting nano-molecular technology and maintains a soft texture.  Offered in Indica, Sativa, and Hybrid with flavors, including our Vegan favorite- Sour Apple.

The first product made by Plus was not gummies.  It was chewing gum.  They quickly pivoted to making their unique square shaped gummies which became a hit in California.  They have continued to innovate with a 'strains' based SKUs- we love Grand Daddy Purple.  All packages come in 5mg servings and 100mg cans, just as their original affect based flavors.

Sensi Chews

Sensi Chews is another OG California edibles brand that is a pioneer in affect-based product formulations.  They began selling their 50 mg THC Amore edibles to enhance sexual pleasure, and 100mg insomnia chews, back in the medical prop 215 days. Their unique taste more closely resembles a tootsie roll, something that earned the brand loyal customers.  Women run, the company more recently launched Sensi Gummies, a more traditional gummy format with 6 flavors of both THC only and THC-CBD ratios which are Vegan, Gluten free, and enhanced with Omega 3.

ReCreate

Recreate is an edibles brand by the Stanley Bothers, who famously bred the CBD-rich strain Charlotte's Web strain inspired by Charlotte Figi , the young girl suffered from Dravet Syndrome, a debilitating form of epilepsy.  Venturing into THC products, the Brand stays with a wellness theme and offers affect-based gummies which are infused with THC, CBD, and botanicals like Yerba Mate, Cordyceps, and Ashwagandha.  Who couldn't use an extra shot of Ashwagandha, right?! Novel and healthy...we're in.

KIVA Camino Gummies

Kiva is on of the largest cannabis manufacturers in the Country, selling multiple lines of products across leading Cannabis markets. Camino Gummies, their best selling infused gummies are known for qualify ingredients, slik packaging, and innovative flavors like Pineapple Habanero, Sparkling Pear, and Watermelon Lemonade.  Extra points for the nice tins.

KIVA Lost Farms

KIVA's newest product is a unique strain-specific, plant-based gummies and chews infused with 100% live resin for a distinctively full spectrum, true-to-the-plant-high.  The exploding taste of strains in Lost Farm is hit with consumers looking for the unabashed taste of weed in their edibles.  All Lost Farms products come in 10 mg servings and 100 mg of THC per package.

Best Cannabis Infused Chocolate 2021

Bhang Cannabis Infused chocolates
Bud's Picks Best Edibles of 2021 - Chocolate: Bhang

Bhang Chocolate

Bhang is a venerable California infused chocolate maker which has gown to operate in seven U.S. states and Canada.   The Brand has evolved, adding DJ Muggs of Cypress Hill to help guide growth, alongside CEO Jamie Pearson, one of the few women running public Cannabis companies  One thing that hasn't changed is delectable taste among the uniquely flavored THC and CBD infused chocolate bars.  Bhang bars come in 100 mg and single serve packaging, with award winning flavors including: Cookies and Cream White Chocolate, Cherry Cream Milk Chocolate, and Espresso Dark Chocolate made with award-winning sustainably-sourced 74% cocoa Dark Chocolate.

For those who like edibles noticeably lacking the taste of cannabis, Bhang is the best tasting chocolate bar on the market.

Kiva

Kiva chocolates bars, infused blueberries and espresso beans are old school California favorite edibles.  Customers consistently choose these trusted infused products from the Oakland based edibles maker.

Satori

The edibles line from CannaCraft features some of our favorite foods dipped in infused chocolate.  Satori's line includes chocolate dipped blueberries, strawberries, and almonds in both milk and dark chocolate options.  These are some of the best tasting edibles on the market, however note that given the natural variation in each piece of fruit or nut, each package containing 100mg will have some variation in the amount of THC per piece.

Best Cannabis Infused Drinks 2021

Pabst Cannabis Infused Drinks
Bud's Picks Best Edibles of 2021 - Drinks: Pabst

Beverages are the fastest growing edible category in the Country.  While most see infused drinks as a refreshing way to consume weed, especially in the summer, these drinks provide a sipping option to the many consumer deciding to quit drinking alcohol.  We see continued growth ahead for this category, and here are best liquid edibles in California:

Pabst Labs

We love to see traditional brewers entering the infused beverage market as a sign of social acceptance for cannabis.  Pabst has been brewing beer since 1844, including namesake Pabst Blue Ribbon.  And in 2021 they made their first 12 oz can of THC infused Lemon Seltzer that's a hit with fans of the brand and weed drinks.  10 mg of THC per refreshing serving.

Hi-Fi Hops

The Fist prominent beer brand to launch a cannabis beverage is Lagunitus Brewing Company, the famed Petaluma brewer.  Hi-Fi Hops is a collab between the Brewer and their north bay neighbors, vape giant AbsoluteXtracts.  Hi-FI Hops taste will never be confused with any of Lagunitas' famed ales, but it does have a refreshing hoppy bubble water taste and is available in 5 and 10 mg cans.

Cann

Taking the micro dose approach to beverages has made Cann an instant hit.  Simple idea.  Low calorie seltzer water infused with interesting flavors and a hint of THC.  Only 2 grams of THC allows folks to indulge, and have a few.  We concur.  Simple yet innovative.  And easy to drink.  Try some this summer...if Ellen DeGeneres will leave some on shelves for the rest of us!

If you are new to edibles, all these products are amazing, however please remember that edibles affect everyone differently, and tolerance to THC doesn't necessarily correlate to an individual's size or weight.  So don't be a hero, start low and go slow to ensure a great experience eating or drinking THC.

 


bud.com Interview: Moi of Tomorrow's Bad Seeds

Moi of Tomorrow's Bad Seeds talks cannabis, music, and life with bud.com 

Tomorrow's Bad Seeds is an LA reggae-rock & fusion band founded by Moises "Moi" Juarez, and Mathew "Mets" McEwan in Hermosa Beach, California. As teens growing up in the South Bay of Los Angeles in the 1990s around a graffiti crew called "TBS," they named their band Tomorrow's Bad Seeds to stay true to their roots of reggae, punk rock, art, skateboarding, surfing, and the underground.  Since their formation in 2004, Tomorrow's Bad Seeds have performed all over the world, taking part in massive nationwide music festivals, and have received a hefty listenership in the contemporary market. Moi stopped by bud.com yesterday to catch up and chat cannabis, music, the band, and the future with us.

Photo by Hector Gutierrez 2019

bud.com: Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds has been a mainstay in the California reggae market for going on two decades, what’s your earliest memory of reggae music?

Moi: That’s an easy one, my earliest memory of reggae music was my uncle Mike. Mike Quinn, playing Earth Crisis…Steel Pulse, on a tape player, when I was maybe… 11 years old? And then he gave it to me later on in life when was 13, 14. But, Steel Pulse, that whole album Wild Goose Chase and that whole record was my first- my favorite track on that record is Wild Goose Chase. And then getting to play with them at the Vault 350 in Long Beach back in the day was frickin’ amazing dude, hahaha. That was definitely something. But yeah, Steel Pulse was definitely the first reggae band I ever heard.

bud.com: When was the first time you ever smoked cannabis?

Moi: hahaha… First time I ever smoked cannabis was when I was 12 with my little sister who was 11. I pulled up, we lived in Redondo Beach on Graham, and it was a triplex type thing, and we lived in the back, and I pulled up from playing hockey, I used to play street hockey all the time, I used to love hockey. And I came up, and I was like, who’s that?! And I smelled it, and I was tripped out— I mean, I had seen it when I was younger because of my dad and stuff but I had never ever tried it. And I pulled up onto the balcony, and my sister was sitting there with her friend Cheryl Mantz, and they were smoking out of a foil pipe, and she handed it to me. At first I was like, “oooh, I’m gonna tell mom.” Then she was like, “Try it.” And I tried it, and that was it. I was hooked for life. hahaha. Pretty much.

bud.com: How do cannabis and your band’s music intertwine? Or do they?

Moi: They definitely do, there’s definitely a sub-culture, that I love to be a part of it. Weed songs are awesome and they’re fun, and so cliché at the time, but ya know. It’s cool, I love it, but it’s not everything to us for sure, ya know?  We wanted to be a little more political in the beginning beginning, and we go through phases ya know? And love is a good big part that we all share. So we write about unity, and love, and stuff, but we don’t really look at it like anything gears us, it’s just whatever forms an idea, especially now, now that it’s so much harder for us to get together since we’ve got kids and stuff. So it’s like, just the, formulation of the idea, we just try to run with it, ya know?

Photo by Kevin Lieberman 2017

bud.com: What is the biggest cannabis event Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds has performed at?

Moi: We’ve played One Love Cali Reggae Fest in Long Beach, California Roots in Monterey, and also that other one back in the day at the same spot, Shoreline Jam. The Queen Mary Event Park, that Long Beach spot is sick.

bud.com: Do you or your band mates ever have weed delivered?

Moi: Yeah, definitely. I’ve definitely tried a couple of different delivery services. But, haha, we’ve all had the weed man show up before and give us our medicine, ya know?

bud.com: Any plans for your band to start your own cannabis brand?

Moi: It’s always been a thought, it’s always been an idea that would be awesome. But, to do it the right way, and the real way, it would be so tedious, and real. You have to have a farm that would be really dedicated to it. Anyone can stamp their name on a flavor and try to make it be something. But, I’d like to splice something cool together, something high in THC, some CBD in there too, but a lot comes with that. Obviously if you were to sign with some company  then they might be able to facilitate something like that for you, but would it be something that we actually want to push like that? It’s hard to make a good strain in my opinion, that’s like the real gold rush, you can have good weed, and sell weed, and have great branding which is a huge part of it all. But if you can create your own strain, that’s a really badass strain, then it’s like, you hit gold, ya know? I gotta plug in Top Shelf Cultivations because if you’ve ever heard of them, they’ve got a strain called the Whoa-Si-Whoa. It’s the Dosi-Do mixed with the White, it’s fuckin… so strong and so good and so tasty. It’s like 90 bucks an 8th.

bud.com What have you done to keep busy during the pandemic and lockdowns since March 2020?

Moi: Hang out with my kids, wrote pretty much a whole new Bad Seeds record, and a whole new solo type of alter ego project I would say. I wouldn’t say I’m ever going to record these songs, haha. Like hip-hop, reggae, blues. A little more late 80s early 90s music. It’s pretty cool. A little like Pharcyde with maybe some Bruno Mars type of singing, because I can kind of get like that. That was produced by DENM, and now I have finished the vocals and the rest of the tracks at Pepper’s studio, and I’m going through that right now. I have a live record too, that we worked on that we haven’t released yet that we’re fine tuning, and then hopefully to release a new Bad Seeds record. DENM produced maybe 4 or 5 of the songs, and the rest of the album is produced by us.

Photo by Amanda Graziano 2021

bud.com: Which do you prefer? Indica, Sativa, Hybrid, and why?

Moi: I like ‘em all. I like them all because I because use them for different things. But I can handle a heavy Indica all day and it won’t really mess with me too much, unless it’s something like the Whoa-Si-Whoa  that I was talking about, like a good strong OG, then I really kinda might not wanna be doing anything. But, I love sativas in the morning or salivas when I’m really getting things going. And hybrids for me, they’re kinda like, whatever. They work sometimes, but really, for me it does affect me like that anymore because I dab a little bit too. I smoke rosin, and not really BHO anymore, good full-melt 6-star hash, rosin, cold press, like expensive stuff. But, I don’t do it often either, I take one or two dabs a day, maybe one late at night when I’m about to go to bed, never in the morning because it kind of ruins my day for real. I could smoke a sativa joint, but like I said, weed now doesn’t hit me like it used to, for sure.

bud.com: Any releases, festivals, or events you want your fans & readers of bud.com to be aware of?

Moi: We’re playing BeachLife Festival, Dry Diggings Festival in Placerville, California coming up. That’s about it, and we’re trying to release a couple of singles first, before we release a full-length or something. Because, you know how works nowadays, every release is kinda like a single. We’re just trying to get shit together, put some quality stuff out next, with visuals too, like a video with every song. It’s almost done.

bud.com: Anything else you’d like to say to the readers?

Moi: Yeah, I was pretty stoned during this interview. Because PapaJake had a really bomb ass joint of some bomb ass cereal milk. I’m a little foggy right now, but I think that’s everything, hahaha.

Article & Interview - June 9, 2021 by Reid Clow for bud.com


bud.com Exclusive: Sublime Fans Gather in Orange County to Celebrate Life of Bradley Nowell

Every year on May 25th, fans, family, and friends of late Sublime frontman Bradley Nowell gather at his headstone in Westminster, CA to celebrate his life, and mourn his tragic loss at age 28 in 1996.  May 25, 2021 happened to be the 25th anniversary of Bradley Nowell passing away.

Bradley and Sublime were known for melding classical reggae standards and cuts with fast, energetic,  sometimes chaotic punk rock, twists of ska, hip-hop, and dancehall music were peppered throughout, along with immense sampling. Over the past 25 years, without their own brainchild, and the ability to tour behind their Self-Titled album which came out just months after Bradley passed away, Sublime has secured their spot in musical history as a catalogue cannabis band proven to withstand the test of time.

(Steve Eichner/Getty Image/WireImages)

This year we arrived at Westminster Memorial Park to a single fan named Rich, hanging out on lawn chairs he had brought himself, drinking a Corona, and blasting Sublime's 1992 debut LP album 40 Oz. To Freedom. The weather was a sunny California day, music blasting, fresh beers in the cooler, dank buds floating around. As the afternoon matured fans began to arrive from all over. One couple mentioned they had made the drive down from Reno, Nevada all the way to Westminster to celebrate the life of Bradley from Sublime with other fans who also love the music.

Shortly after the bud.com crew arrived, as did long time Sublime fan Jerome "Romy Rome" Aken, who tends to function as communal Master of Ceremonies. We asked Romy to speak the poem he wrote for Bradley long ago, so we could share it with the fans here:

 

 

Life never ends

Rest in peace my friend

Your time here was short

But you gave a lot

And for that you'll never be forgot   

So many lives you've touched

And so many I've seen myself

Your music will never die

And so you live on in us all

Rest in Peace Bradley 

-Jerome Aken

Fans ordered and enjoyed their traditional pizzas which were delivered inside of the cemetery. Fans and friends of the band  traded stories and contact information and took in the atmosphere, celebrating fantastic music from a life taken too soon by drug addiction.

(Fans gather on Shakespeare Ln. in Westminster Memorial Park & Mortuary May 25, 2021 in memory of Bradley Nowell.)

Also in attendance on May 25, 2021 was RAS1, singer-songwriter of the Long Beach Dub Allstars and Long Beach Shortbus. After the untimely passing of Bradley, Sublime rhythm section Eric Wilson & Bud Gaugh created the Long Beach Dub Allstars with close friends & extended band personnel. They chose RAS1 to lead the project on guitar and vocals as they felt he fit in best, and could continue to make music with them. RAS1 performed several Sublime and Long Beach Dub Allstars hits yesterday, and also played a new unreleased song called Bounces Off My Soul featuring collaborator Eddie Villa. You can check that out below, available exclusively on the bud.com YouTube channel. RAS1 also has a new solo record coming out soon.

Click HERE for RAS1 on instagram. Click HERE for RAS1 on Facebook. 

With each passing year, reminders of Sublime and Bradley Nowell's massive impact on our culture are everywhere, especially here on the west coast. Walk into any bar in California any time of day, sit for an hour, and one is sure to hear the bellowing voice of Bradley Nowell. The music speaks for itself. If only he had been here to witness the impact he has had on many of us.

REST IN PEACE BRADLEY JAMES NOWELL, 25 YEARS. 

2-22-1968 - 5-25-1996 

 


bud.com Artist Interview: Kyle Smith

            This week, our bud.com artist spotlight is something everyone can enjoy. Coming up quickly out of Ventura, California, reggae-rock, ska-punk, hip-hop musician Kyle Smith has been rocking backyards and private events across America for the last fifteen months. Before the pandemic, you could find him playing local gigs during the week around Southern California, flying out of town every weekend, while managing a day job and a personal life. Not much has changed, he has just had to shift his creativity in venue choice. For those who know him, it goes without saying, and for those who don't, Kyle Smith has a hell of a story to tell. With going on eight years of sobriety from everything under his belt, and a myriad of experience helping other addicts get clean, we've had some fans ask us, "Why would a weed website be interviewing a sober musician?" Well, because we personally know many people in the cannabis community who listen to Kyle and love his music. We hope you enjoy the interview below as much as we enjoyed putting it together. - bud.com

 

bud.com: So, your fans are wondering how you balance work, work, work, and work? Do you ever get the chance to rest?

Kyle Smith: I used to take my Sundays seriously, now the only rest I get is between midnight and 5AM every damn day. Either that, or it’s a red-eye flight from here to New York balls out landing at 7AM, turning around the next night to get back to LA on Sunday morning. I guess I set aside at least 1 or 2 days a month. Life is urgent, and I get to where I want to be fast. The more shit I eat now, the more comfortable I’ll be later.

bud.com: What are the best part and the worst part of being an organic, grassroots music artist?

Kyle Smith: The best parts are where people pull me aside after a show and I get to hug them, and they get to tell me about how my lyrics or a song I wrote impacted them, or someone they know, in recovery, or how something I wrote impacted them. That’s one of the most important things to me, and that’s what makes all the hard work and every gig worth it. Lifelong fans, people who go hard for you, and stay in your corner, and know that you’re not perfect, and will always have your back anyway. I’ve been able to build a family with people I’ve met from all over the country, and I’ll take that over some poppy, flashy bullshit any day.

The downside to being grassroots is nothing comes easy. There’s a lot of investment made that takes a long time to pay off.  I don’t have the millions of plays and views that people backed by labels do. If I drop a song, it’s up to me to make sure it gets into every person’s ears, and it’s not immediately dropped into the top 50 reggae songs, like some labels can do.

bud.com: You play a lot of reggae music mixed with other genres such as punk rock, ska, hip-hop, dancehall, and more. How do all of these types of music intertwine with the cannabis community?

Kyle Smith: We like rebel music, and I think there’s all different kinds of rebel music. I know that growing up as a huge weed smoker,  even before around 2012, smoking weed was looked down upon. I think that a lot of punk rock and reggae, and rebel music, is a big middle finger to the system, and I think that’s what I’ve always been about since I was a kid. Some shit just sounds better when you’re fuckin’ stoned. Weed always made me smile and so do punk rock and reggae. That’s how I associate the two.

bud.com As a recovering addict and fully sober individual, do you see a societal benefit for cannabis in a medicinal and recreational way?

1000% both, no doubt about it, will always believe in my heart until the day that I die.

bud.com What are your views on how the music industry has changed during a 15-month long global quarantine at the time of this interview?

Kyle Smith: I think some of us have become disturbingly comfortable with the lack of live music. I think we have become somewhat conditioned to live music not being a thing over the last year, and it’s really scary. And I think we need to get it back immediately before people get used to this. I think people appreciate and are willing to drive further than ever to go to any live music event right now. I know a lot of artists and bands have spent this whole time recording, and I think there’s going to be a massive slingshot when things fully open in January of 2022. I think for everybody that has been putting in work this whole time, or for everybody who ground through the pandemic, is about to blow up next January.

bud.com: What record have you purchased the most ever?

Kyle Smith: 40 oz To Freedom by Sublime. It’s a tie between 40 oz to Freedom & Everything You Need by Slightly Stoopid, for sure. I probably have 11 copies of 40 oz to Freedom.

bud.com: What is your dream guitar to own?

Kyle Smith: I grew up listening to shitty punk rock and I don’t really care what type of guitar it is, but I would like another 12-string acoustic Martin. Though, I do love Ibanez, they’re my number one electric and bass guitars for sure.

bud.com: When can fans expect to see your new album out?

Kyle Smith: August 2021.

bud.com: Anything else you’d like to say to your fans or the readers of bud.com?

Kyle Smith: Big shoutout to bud.com for having me on your interview, I would love everybody to know that although I am 100% clean and sober from everything, I always have and always will support the cannabis industry and community. Come find me on instagram @KyleSmithJams or Facebook.com/KyleSmithJam

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B6Z-Rz31TS0


bud.com Artist Spotlight - The Happys

Sunsets, campfires, debauchery, waves, and a bag of your finest California chronic are some of the simple pleasures one will see Marin County locals The Happys enjoying while they spread their sounds far and wide across the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond. When tuning into The Happys, a listener will be meandered down a sonic river reminiscent of hopping in Doc Brown's DeLorean back to the 90s in Seattle, Long Beach, and San Francisco, bending genres and creating fresh, new surf/rock music for all ears while maintaining true to their roots and inspirations. bud.com had the chance to catch up with Nick Petty, founding lead singer/songwriter of the band. 

bud.com: bud.com is a San Francisco based company with deep ties to the North Bay Area, what does being from Marin County mean to The Happys?

Nick: It’s just kind of like being born near a big city, San Francisco. I think a lot of dope music came from here like Tupac, Steve Miller, and all that. It’s one of those places where you either run with the creativity, or live comfortably and don’t do anything. So it either makes or breaks people’s creativity.

bud.com: What is your favorite part about being an artist from the bay area?

Nick: In Southern California the mainstream of entertainment is there, so I think when you’re from the bay, if you’re serious about art, it gets respected in a really cool way. People dive into it because it’s not as common, so I think there’s a vibrancy that’s rare that you can get in the bay.

bud.com: For those just discovering The Happys, how would you describe The Happys musical stylings? What songs should readers check out first?

Nick: It’s taken a lot from Nirvana and Sublime, and a bit of Johnny Cash in a way, as in I’m someone who came from county jails through the mental health system, drug abuse issues with harder drugs. It resonates with people who struggle with their own mindsets and living on a day to day basis.

Probably Hannah’s Song, Trippin, You’re Getting Me Pissed as far as songs.

bud.com: Do you or your bandmates ever have your weed delivered?

Nick: Yeah. The whole band does.

bud.com: What did cannabis mean to you growing up, and how has your viewpoint or relationship changed with it over time?

Nick: Cannabis is really good to unwind, just like coffee is good to get you jacked up and ready to work. Cannabis is good after you’ve been working to decompress, and not be stressed out. It means a lot to me, because when my dad had cancer, smoking with him was a really good bonding experience. It also kept my grandpa alive when he had cancer. It’s great for appetite when people are sick. If weed’s strong enough it will humble you and make you think about the world in a bigger way, because I think I’m naturally geared like a lot of people to get egotistical, so I think weed breaks that down a little bit. I like that. It humbles me.

bud.com: How has cannabis influenced your music?

Nick: It’s part of The Happys counter-culture. We kind of try to stay clear from hard drugs and things like that. I think weed is the perfect in-between. It’s a great social lubricant, and I feel like it’s part of the culture of meeting up, shooting the shit, people of different backgrounds, all coming together, and putting the shit aside, busting out a guitar. That’s kind of the culture of The Happys. Shooting the shit, venting out about, maybe they had a bad day, it’s so common to have a bad day. It’s really good to decompress and hit a park with your homies and smoke a joint.

bud.com A few years ago The Happys played a festival outside for 2,000 people on Haight Street, if I recall correctly, how did that go, and how did that event tie into the cannabis community?

Nick: The whole counter-culture of Haight-Ashbury is so prominent with weed, it’s one of those spots, like Venice Beach, or something like that. There’s a lot of stoners over there, a lot of the Grateful Dead and Jimi Hendrix lived on Haight. Sid Vicious lived on Haight, and Janis Joplin around the corner. It’s such a dope spot, it was so important that The Happys played there. It’s a place of historical significance, you got Hippie Hill, and 4-20 was invented at San Rafael High School by this group called The Waldos who would try to steal the weed near this airforce base at 4:20.

Marin’s weird about weed, they don’t have dispensaries, so when people meet up to smoke, it’s this big thing. There are little people from pockets like Sonoma, to Stockton, to Palo Alto, they all come to Hippie Hill to get super blazed.

Haight Street is celebrated in that way with psychedelics and weed. We had a great show there and still have fans from that show. We’re with that shit. I don’t want to tell kids to go do psychedelics, but they’re smart enough to know the band has done a bit of that, and we resonate with the Haight-Ashbury people a bit.

bud.com: What have you done to keep busy during the pandemic?

Nick: That’s a great question. People always said at The Happys shows, you guys are the best band, you are going to blow up! First of all, we have to have hundreds of thousands of people hear about us, so I’ve been studying guerrilla marketing, and things like that, expanding the fanbase, writing hella songs. My dad had passed before quarantine, and so did a good friend. I was going to pay for it mentally, so I started writing new songs. I worked on opening that venue in Novato…Novato means Rookie in Spanish…

bud.com: If your local fans, family, and friends knew they could get weed delivered locally in Marin County via bud.com, do you think they would check it out?

Nick: Yes, especially if at first they could get some sort of hookup, like sometimes people get thrown in an extra joint or something like that.

bud.com: When will you have some new music coming out?

Nick: June 4th. But, by late September the whole second full-length album is supposed to come out.

bud.com: Anything else you would like your fans or the readers of bud.com to know?

Nick: Listen to The Happys. Spotify. YouTube.
I appreciate it for real.


Let's bend the arc towards Equal Justice

tldr; happy 4th of July - †oo many Americans aren't free. This weekend bud.com is matching donations to Equal Justice Initiative.

A few weeks ago we watched as Americans confronted each other in the streets. Some members of our team and their families marched in solidarity: we agree with the cries to value black lives and to hold our justice system accountable.

People handling cannabis have been at the receiving end of aggressive policing for decades. Certain communities, particularly black and latinx communities, were targeted by police representing the predominately white lawmakers who initially criminalized marijuana plant medicine. Now formal regulations allow companies like bud.com to sell cannabis proudly in public, online even. As our weed delivery business takes shape, we have a special obligation to pay back for the costs of the war on drugs. Decades of locking up people for what is now legal has limited the potential for generations of black and brown entrepreneurs.

We looked at charities that specifically focus on healing drug war and cannabis prohibition wounds. But there's a bigger problem out there: the creeping reach of the carceral state. For too many people beyond pot the tools of government are punitive and not enabling. The deep unrest roiling our country will only come to calm through challenging interventions to improve our collective conduct. Since our justice system is a reflection of our values made into rules, it is critical that we live up to our best values of equality. Beyond bud, everyone deserves quality justice.

Equal Justice Initiative is working to establish the basic rules of fairness and equality under law. Based in Montgomery Alabama, EJI has the nation's deep economic roots in slavery just underfoot as they work to help the wrongly convicted and the poor get access to effective legal representation.

This Independence Day weekend you can elect to add a donation to the Equal Justice Initiative to your purchase. bud.com will be matching those donations. We went looking for a charity making a direct impact on a serious sustained social ill. We believe Equal Justice Initiative is part of the solution to addressing America's racist past and building a better more equal future.

Update:

We ran this campaign to raise money for the Equal Justice Initiative over the Independence Day weekend. Across our locations, 31% of bud shoppers elected to make a donation to support EJI with us. This is much higher than we had expected; we were delighted and humbled by our customers' participation.


Black Lives Matter.

Bud believes, unequivocally, that Black Lives Matter. We are committed to doing our part in the fight against white supremacy, and against the ongoing institutional violence and disenfranchisement facing the black community. As a cannabis industry business, we recognize our deeper responsibility in responding to this crisis.

We know that we are late in making this statement. It was important to us that our response include the voices of our black colleagues, so we have spent the last few weeks in roundtable discussions, collaboratively defining our values and brainstorming ways we can make tangible impact both now and on a continuing basis.

Systemic racism and police brutality are not new issues facing black people, nor will they be resolved overnight. Cannabis industry businesses in particular have a responsibility to undo the gentrification of our industry and uplift communities that have been impacted by the war on drugs. We will be following up this statement with an action plan outlining specific steps we can take as a company and with our supply chain. These actions will be written in a scaleable way, ensuring that the impact we're able to make grows alongside us as we do. We look forward to sharing our commitments with you soon.

In love and solidarity,

Bud

Rest In Power:

Rayshard Brooks. Robert Fuller. Dominique Alexander. Riah Milton. Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells. Oluwatoyin Salau. Jamel Floyd. David McAtee. Malcom Harsch. Tony McDade. George Floyd. Dion Johnson. Breonna Taylor. Sean Reed. Steven Demarco Taylor. Manuel Ellis. Ahmaud Arbery. Darius Tarver. William Green. Michael Lorenzo Dean. Eric Reason. Ariane McCree. Kobe Dimock-Heisler. Atatiana Jefferson. Christopher Whitfield. Christopher McCorvey. Brian Quinones. Elijah McClain. Devon Bailey. Isak Aden. Ryan Matthew Smith. Dominique Clayton. Pamela Turner. Troy Hodge. Miles Hall. Ralph Bell. Willie McCoy. Bradley Blackshire. Ronell Foster. Jemel Roberson. Botham Jean. Nia Wilson. Marcus Deon Smith. Antwon Rose. Stephon Clark. Charleena Lyles. Timothy Caughman. Aaron Bailey. Jordan Edwards. Alteria Woods. Cordale Handy. Terrill Thomas. Mary Truxillo. Kevin Hicks. Demarcus Semer. Tyre King. Terence Crutcher. Korryn Gaines. Paul O’Neal. Alton Sterling. Joseph Mann. Philando Castile. Randy Nelson. David Joseph. Kionte Spencer. Peter Gaines. Sylville Smith. Torrey Robinson. Willie Tillman. Marco Loud. Antronie Scott. Darius Robinson. Janet Wilson. Christopher Davis. Wendell Celestine. Calin Roquemore. Dyzhawn Perkins. Quintonio Legrier. Keith Childress Jr. Bettie Jones. Kevin Matthews. Michael Noel. Miguel Espinal. Janisha Fonville. Lamontez Jones. Patterson Brown. Dominic Hutchinson. Michael Lee Marshall. Jamar Clark. Bennie Lee Tignor. India Kager. Angelo Delano Perry. Corey Jones. La’Vante Biggs. Tyree Crawford. Alonzo Smith. Nathaniel Harris Pickett. Anthony Ashford. Keith Harrison McKleod. Junior Prosper. Christian Taylor. Assahms Pharoh Manley. Michael Sabbie. Brian Keith Day. Felix Kumi. Albert Joseph Davis. Samuel Dubose. Billy Ray Davis. Albert Joseph Davis. Sandra Bland. Salvado Ellswood. George Mann. Jonathan Sanders. Kalief Browder. Darrius Stewart. Brendon Glenn. Alexia Christian. William Chapman II. Freddie Gray. Walter Scott. Eric Harris. Phillip White. Mya Hall. Anthony Hill. Tony Robinson. Corey Carter. Natasha McKenna. Frank Smart. Matthew Ajibade. Jerame Reid. Rumain Brisbon. Tamir Rice. Akai Gurley. Tanisha Anderson. Laquan McDonald. Darrien Hunt. Michelle Cusseaux. Dante Parker. Ezell Ford. Michael Brown. John Crawford III. Eric Garner. Victor White III. Yvette Smith. Renisha McBride. Larry Jackson Jr. Terrence Franklin. Tayler Rock. Clinton R. Allen. Derrick Ambrose Jr. Wayne Arnold Jones. Kendrick Johnson. Karvas Gamble Jr. Victor Duffy Jr. Rekia Boyd. Trayvon Martin. Ramarley Graham. Reginald Doucet Jr. Danroy “DJ” Henry Jr. Aiyana Stanley-Jones. Oscar Grant III. Sean Bell. Martin Lee Anderson. Timothy Thomas. Alfred Abuka Sanders. Amadou Diallo. Demetrius Dubose. Bobby Russ. James Byrd Jr. Nicholas Heyward Jr. Malice Green. Tycel Nelson. Phillip Pannell. Martin Luther King Jr. Malcom X. Cynthia Wesley. Carole Robertson. Addie May Collins. Medgar Evers. Emmett Till. Mary Turner. Henry Smith. The millions of enslaved black people who remain unnamed. And so many more.

 


Cannabis Delivery and COVID19 Coronavirus Quarantine

At bud.com delivery, we serve people out in the world, in their homes. During this outbreak of Spring 2020 we wanted to explain how bud.com is handling home delivery of cannabis in this pandemic quarantine for SARS-CoV-2 virus and the disease it causes, named “coronavirus disease 2019” (COVID-19).

Safe delivery steps we take in cannabis delivery during COVID19 coronavirus quarantine

State cannabis regulations mandate that we deliver the package to an adult over 21, so unfortunately we can't leave cannabis on the doorstep. Our drivers keep a respectful distance, and keep hand-sanitizer in their cars for use between calls. When they come to work and between deliveries we encourage our team to wash their hands and wear gloves.

Our delivery team members stay home if they are sick. Sick drivers can mean a late delivery, or closing early; better safe than sorry. We apologize for any service interruptions. We are hiring cannabis delivery drivers to meet demand.

We have been mindful of germs from the beginning since we serve immunocompromised customers. Ultimately any contact with the outside world carries risks; we work to minimize our potential to spread illness. 

Cannabis: like medicine + groceries

As our society decides how to function during a pandemic, we could run a social experiment: trap folks indoors for weeks without access to weed. It's possible that governments could order the closure of all "non-vital" businesses. Early in the spread of the pandemic, Italy ordered a closure to all businesses except groceries and drug stores. Would that kind of order effect cannabis businesses? We would argue cannabis is a bit of both grocery and pharmacy. Some people rely on cannabis as medicine to treat conditions and manage chronic pain. These patients should not unduly expose themselves to germs leaving the house to get medical marijuana. Other people will turn to alcohol from the market, drinking at home to blur the boredom. Too much isolated booze consumption can have sad side effects. We hope bud.com can provide a safe way for home-bound people to get access to lab-tested medical and recreational cannabis.

Assuming our supply chain members can stay healthy, we aim to continue weed delivery in the weeks ahead as the streets and businesses grow more quiet. Our bud.com team is already virtual. All of us live close with older folks and we are concerned to protect them from undue exposure.

In this unexpected time, too many businesses will close. We love our local restaurants, clubs, theaters, dance studios, coffee shops, bars - they're going to take a huge hit in the spring 2020. It's going to upend a lot of lives. We hope our supply chains can stay healthy so we can serve during a rough time.  We all need to aggressively support those people and communities impacted, if there are mass closures.

We have definitely noticed an uptick in requests: more people are ordering residential cannabis delivery during the day. It's a bit like the weekend didn't end on Monday 9 March, the orders just kept coming in. Perhaps cannabis use can alleviate the side effects of being trapped inside for days and weeks. Perhaps we want sleep aids because there appears to be more to worry about. Perhaps we'll take on indoor calisthenics and need something to take the ache off.  Rest assured our shelves are stocked and we are able to keep up with demand and deliver cannabis products safely and mindfully during this very weird time. 

At bud.com, we work to have a healthy company that can serve lab-tested products to people who want to remain healthy. We wish good luck and good health to all of us. Thanks to Sandra Garcia from The New York Times who gave us a chance to speak to these issues in her April 10 article "Staying Safe While Delivering Weed in the Pandemic".


Peak Cannabis Numerology Foiled?

If 4/20 is a holiday based on calendar numbering, this year is the most epic 4/20 there may ever be in human history! Not only is the day 4/20, but the whole month is also 4/20! And if you write the whole thing it's 4/20/2020 which is just a lot of 20. And if you write 4/20/20, there's 20/20 vision in there. Not until 4/20/2420 might the pot party potential be this big again.

And then coronavirus emerged to reset so much of human planning.

prohibited: pot prerolls in the park with strangers

So now for 4/20/20 we aren't going to be passing joints between strangers in a park. Many of us will be staring at futures grown more uncertain than usual. Death and illness loom larger in conversation. Maybe we need a party more than ever - to see a stranger and see them smiling because they're not wearing a mask.

But we don't puff puff pass in public on 4/20 this year. Because we value the human tribe. We value our elders. We don't want to be responsible for helping infect people we love. We don't want to lose more folks than we have to.

We can be inside if we have to. And cannabis can help us abide isolation, insecurity, anxiety, and boredom.

One Sesh In

To make Monday a bit memorable for marijuana mavens, a few of our dispensary partners are promoting The Great American Sesh In - a virtual online smoke session with famous tokers. Aundre Specialé is billed as a guest, as is Tommy Chong. I plan to drop by for a spell to see what's an online sesh; I hope the audience gets a chance to meet itself.

The event runs with @TheGreatAmericanSeshIn on Twitch on 4/20 from 11am-6pm PST. Sounds like a bit of a telethon (bongathon? tokeathon? tokealong?), with proceeds will benefit Direct Relief, working to get protective gear and critical care medications to health workers on the front-lines of COVID-19.

The dispensaries are promoting The Great American Sesh In to give their dedicated audience a reason to stay home on 4/20. From the program's web site: "you are flattening the rush of patrons to your location on 4/20, and safely maintaining social distancing." Dispensaries don't want to see a long queue of people lined up for 4/20 deals when they only have curbside pickup. How strange is this time! Consider delivery for 4/20 instead of going anywhere weed-related.

delivery on 4/20

bud.com will be running safe legal delivery of fire weed and compelling cannabis products for all of 4/20, with a number of deals featured across our service - check your area. We have been busier than ever in the last month. Crews of dedicated folks work on delivery, dispatch, and dispensary operations to keep the cannabis flowing. Some of us are socially isolated in our homes. Some of us are driving to people's homes to make deliveries. We are grateful for our front line folks, who are working hard and taking precautions to protect themselves and you.

One of our early business partners told me something he liked about working in weed. He says cannabis promotes proactive empathy. Let's recognize what's happening here: we value our collective safety and health, so we're not going to see each other out in the world for this momentous moment of marijuana numerology. We are alone together. Maybe this 4/20 we connect online. Ultimately, let's remember much of the journey is inwards. Good luck, be well, have the fun you can.


educating veterans about cannabis

Ryan Miller runs Operation E*V*A*C (Educating Veterans About Cannabis) based in the San Francisco Bay Area, California. Their mission is to “support the growth and healing of veterans through mutual assistance, personal development, and community service.” He hosts 16 veterans meetings a month across six different cannabis dispensaries, serving about 80 veterans.

Miller is now training another facilitator so the program can expand into the South Bay in Northern California. Each facilitators has studied “Mindful Resilience for Trauma Recovery” by the Veterans Yoga Project. They undertook Peer Specialist Training with the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, enabling them to provide peer support through the VA, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

How do they guide veterans to use cannabis? Miller replies: “Cannabis is so subjective. Really it’s going to be trial and error until the patient figures out what's best for them. We can offer guidance on how to trial and error safely.”

Miller suggests people begin with edibles: start with a conservative portion, wait 60-90 minutes for onset, then maybe take more if you need it. If people take too much, he suggests that taking CBD can help balance the impact of THC, and black pepper as well. (Because it contains terpenes, smelling black pepper can help people come down a bit immediately and chewing black peppercorns can help balance the high in about an hour.)  Where did he pick up his knowledge? From years working at Bay Area dispensaries, learning from the patients and their experiences.

Do veterans have unique consumption patterns? Miller responds immediately: “Veterans tend to be on the higher end of consumption, in terms of milligram content, in terms of frequency. Of course they're all different, they’re not a homogenous group, but it's definitely on the higher end of consumption.”

This high consumption rate means that veterans are not happy about the 100 mg milligram limits for edibles in California. You can’t buy a single 1,000 mg edible brownie; now edibles can’t have more than 100 mg in a package. So someone with PTSD who needs 1,000 mg each morning to manage their anxiety must purchase and consume ten 100 mg brownies. Miller remarks acidly “you're going to treat people's pain but give them diabetes.”

Ryan Miller currently hosts veteran’s services in a dispensary setting. Thinking big, he wants to use that as an advocacy platform, promoting safe access for veterans in every state. “You shouldn't have to leave your friends, your family, your work, your community, your church, to come to California, Washington, Colorado to get your medicine.” Miller observes veterans coming to California and sleeping in their cars to get access to cannabis to treat their pain.

“We fought for the country, not the state.”

Ryan Miller stands up after submitting public commentary to the Bureau of Cannabis Control, Oakland, August 7 2018
Ryan Miller stands up after submitting public commentary to the Bureau of Cannabis Control, Oakland, August 7 2018

What about the long term? Miller envisions safe access to cannabis for active duty troops: “We're doing the work that the VA should be doing,” he says. “because the VA should be giving compassionate cannabis to troops like they are so willing to do with opioids & antidepressants.”

We asked Ryan Miller what a delivery service could do to help support veteran communities. We agreed we could help spread the word about Operation EVAC with articles like this. And, Miller suggested, we could help veterans get access to cannabis.

bud.com is proud to offer Veterans a discount on their cannabis delivery purchases. We believe cannabis is powerful medicine and we want to promote healing where it can provide real benefit. Once they sign up with bud.com during checkout, veterans automatically have 5% taken off all future purchases. We’re excited to offer more affordable cannabis, especially to those people with limited mobility.

 

Justin Hall is a retired rogue tech reporter, perhaps the first blogger, and the Chief Technology Officer of bud.com